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Join Us at Spinnaker Live TODAY!

By Announcement, Blog, Staff

Find out why 2020 is the year of Spinnaker at https://Spinnaker.Live on June 18th at 9:00am PDT. Learn how enterprises accelerate with open source Spinnaker at this Linux Foundation virtual conference co-hosted by the CD Foundation and Armory.

Register now!

“The CD Foundation seeks to improve the world’s capacity to deliver software with security and speed,” said Rosalind Benoit, Director of Community at Armory, and Chair of the CD Foundation Outreach Committee. “Spinnaker.Live speaks to everyone invested in software delivery collaboration and automation. Open source is powered by connections, and this event is to meet, connect, and hear great stories. Please bring your energy and ideas to this incredible global community!”

Spinnaker is a free and open source continuous delivery software platform developed by Netflix and Google to create tailor-made, collaborative continuous delivery pipelines. With unique multi-cloud building blocks, it integrates all the tools, approvals, and infrastructure needed to automate an enterprise software delivery lifecycle.

Spinnaker is housed under the CD Foundation umbrella at the Linux Foundation. It is a Founding Project of the CD Foundation. 

Continued Growth in 2020

Spinnaker is continuing to grow in 2020, boasting more contributors and more Pull Requests than ever before.

Key statistics for 2020

  • Q1 2020 was the first quarter since Spinnaker was open sourced that the project had at least 2 new contributors each week
  • Of the 1,183 contributors to Spinnaker in the last year, 464, or 40%, contributed in Q1 2020
  • Merged Pull Requests have skyrocketed in 2020. These are the code and documentation contributions that the project accepts and incorporates.
    • Average since open sourced: 399/month
    • Average in the last 12 months: 605/month
      • Previous high was 656 (March 2019, 1.6x the average since being open sourced)
    • February 674 (1.7x avg)
    • March 891 (2.2x avg)
    • April 962 (2.5x avg)
    • May 755 (1.9x avg)

Notable Amazon Support

Spinnaker has been implemented widely with well known companies like Adobe, AirBnb, Autodesk, Comcast, Salesforce, SAP, and many more using Spinnaker to handle the software delivery life cycle. Of note, Amazon Web Service (AWS) has dramatically increased contributions to Spinnaker in 2020. 

Up-to-date statistics are available on Devstats. They show a strong spike coming into 2020 in AWS contributions, with pull requests in recent months more than tripling 2019’s monthly highs. Amazon has stated publicly that they are backing Spinnaker due to strong enterprise customer demand. 

AWS will be prominently represented at Spinnaker.Live with a keynote, breakout session, panel, and use case talks from AWS experts and companies who deploy software to AWS. Don’t miss it!

Register Now!

DevOps.com: CD Foundation Touts Spinnaker CD Progress

By In The News

At an online Spinnaker Live event today, the Continuous Delivery (CD) Foundation revealed the open source CD platform is gaining significant momentum since being contributed by Netflix late last year.

There were on average 399 merged pull Spinnaker requests a month in the first quarter of 2020. A total of 1,183 contributors participated in the project in the last year, with 40% of those contributors participating in the first quarter. Since the first quarter, the project has added at least two new contributors a week.

Rosalind Benoit, chair of the CD Foundation Outreach Committee and director of community at Armory, a provider of an enterprise edition of Spinnaker, said the bulk of the increased contributions to Spinnaker are coming from Amazon Web Services (AWS), which the cloud service provider is already employing to orchestrate software delivery across multiple platforms.

READ MORE

9 CD Foundation Projects Are Participating in this Year’s Google Summer of Code

By Blog, Staff

The CD Foundation has joined the list of organizations participating in Google’s Summer of Code (GSoc) this year. GSoC is an annual program aimed at bringing more student developers into open source software development. The CD Foundation projects Spinnaker and Screwdriver joined long-time participant Jenkins in providing mentors for a number of projects for students interested in continuous delivery and software pipeline infrastructure.

In total, 7 Jenkins projects, 2 Spinnaker and 1 Screwdriver project were accepted in this summer’s program. Mentors from many different organizations around the world are pitching in, including CD Foundation ambassadors.

“The CD Foundation is dedicated to supporting open source continuous delivery projects worldwide. Part of that mission includes supporting and encouraging the next generation of talented developers worldwide, said Tara Hernandez, Senior Engineering Manager, Google Cloud Platform and CD Foundation Technical Oversight Committee member. “Thank you to the students and mentors who work tirelessly to create and innovate for the GSoC. We hope everyone has a fantastic time coding and learning this summer. Congratulations!”

The following is a list of the projects accepted and links to each project description and associated mentors.

Jenkin’s Projects 

Loghi Perinpanayagam – Jenkins Machine Learning Plugin for Data Science

This project provides a plugin for data scientists to integrate Machine Learning Workflow with Jenkins.

Kezhi Xiong – GitHub Checks API for Jenkins Plugins

The GitHub Checks API allows developers to report the CI integrations’ detail information rather than binary pass/fail build status on GitHub pages.

stellargo – External Fingerprint Storage for Jenkins

File fingerprinting is a way to track which version of a file is being used by a job/build, making dependency tracking easy.

Rishabh Budhouliya – Git Plugin Performance Improvement

The principles of micro-benchmarking were used to create and execute a test suite which involves comparison of GitClient APIs implemented by CliGitAPIImpl and JGitAPIImpl using “average execution time per operation” as a performance metric.

Buddhika Chathuranga – Jenkins Windows Services: YAML Configuration Support

Enhance Jenkins master and agent service management on Windows by offering new configuration file formats and improving settings validation.

Zixuan Liu – Jenkins X: Consolidate the use of Apps / Addons

The main aim of the project is to consolidate Apps and Addons inside Jenkins X to avoid confusion.

Sladyn Nunes Custom Jenkins Distribution Build Service

The main idea behind the project is to build a customizable Jenkins distribution service that could be used to build tailor-made Jenkins distributions.

Spinnaker Projects

Victor Odusanya – Drone CI type for Spinnaker pipeline stage

Add Drone build type as a Spinnaker pipeline stage type.

Moki Daniel – “Continuous Delivery, Continuous Deployments with Spinnaker” 

This project idea will aim at ensuring continuous delivery and continuous deployments, bringing up automated releases, undertaking deployments across multiple cloud providers, and mastering the best built-in deployments practices from Spinnaker.

Screwdriver Project

Supratik Das – Improve SCM Integration

The two key areas where Screwdriver will be improved are introduction of deployment keys for seamless handling of private repositories and triggering of builds from external SCM repositories.

Thank you to all participants! We look forward to getting updates and information on progress over the summer. For more details, please continue to visit the CD Foundation blog.

From Armory – The World of Jenkins: Better #withSpinnaker

By Blog, Member
Jenkins and Spinnaker, Better Together

Originally posted on the Armory blog by Rosalind Benoit

Folks in the DevOps community often ask me, “I’m already using Jenkins, so why should I use Spinnaker?” We’re hosting a virtual talk to address the question! Register here to join us 3/26 and learn how Jenkins and Spinnaker cooperate for safe, scalable, maintainable software delivery.

A delivery engineer I spoke with last week said it best:

“I came from a world of using Jenkins to deploy. It’s great but, you’re just modifying Jenkins jobs. It can do a lot, but it’s like that line in Jurassic Park – ‘Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.’”

Many of us came from that world: we built delivery automation with scripts and tools like Jenkins, CircleCI, Bamboo, and TeamCity. We found configuration management, and used Puppet or Ansible to provision infrastructure in our pipelines as code. We became addicted to D.R.Y. (don’t repeat yourself), and there is no looking back.

Jenkins provides approachable automation of continuous integration steps. Spinnaker works with Jenkins to pick up and deliver build artifacts, and to delegate pipeline stages. As a true continuous delivery platform, Spinnaker codifies your unique software delivery culture and processes to your comfort level. It also adds production-ready value to your pipelines:

  • Turnkey automation of advanced delivery strategies such as canary deployments
  • One-click rollbacks
  • Single pane of glass to view deployments, applications, server groups, clusters, load balancers, security groups, and firewalls
  • Centralized API to automate and integrate across your toolchain

Jenkins taught us many lessons. It popularized the use of imperative pipelines to execute ordered steps in a SDLC. It taught us that centralizing delivery workflows into one platform makes strategic sense in scaling operations. At the same time, especially when used for deployments, it suffers from instability and maintenance overhead brought by unchecked plugin sprawl. It struggles to offer a scalable model for managing multiple jobs and distributed apps. But the way it consolidated SDLC tasks within a full-featured GUI empowered developer teams to start doing delivery.

In the new world of fast innovation through immutable infrastructure, Spinnaker has adapted that visibility to the realms of cloud and cloud native. It provides a centralized vantage point on all of your ephemerally-packaged applications, in their many variations.  Within your pipelines, its guardrails identify invalid or non-compliant infrastructure before deployment even happens. Spinnaker’s smart delivery workflows insulate customers and end-users from impact to their software experience.

This sense of safety is Jenkins’ missing ingredient. Jenkins introduced a world where developers could independently chain together a path to production. It enabled us to improve our efficiency and code quality through testing and build automation, with self-service. This giant technological shift sparked a move away from waterfall development and ITIL-style delivery.

But, culture cannot change overnight. Developers who exercised this newfound power struck terror in the hearts of those accountable for availability and software-driven business goals. Culture lagged behind tooling, sparking fear and risk aversion. That fear still permeates many organizations, allowing baggage-free startups and the most nimble companies to digitally disrupt the status quo. These innovators prove that delivering highly valued interactions through software means increased profit and influence. Enter Armory Spinnaker.


Watch Armory CTO Isaac Mosquera’s Supercharge Your Deployments With Spinnaker and Jenkins presentation at CD Summit, or check out the longer version with Q&A at DeliveryConf.

Stop spending time and talent knitting your toolchain together with pipeline steps that rely on brittle, expensive-to-maintain scripts and repetitive GUI fiddles! Attend “I have Jenkins; why do I need Spinnaker?” to learn more about how Spinnaker can free your developers and evolve your continuous delivery game.

From Armory – Kubernetes Native: Introducing Spinnaker Operator

By Blog, Member

Originally posted on the Armory blog by German Muzquiz

Spinnaker Operator is now Beta!

With Spinnaker Operator, define all the configurations of Spinnaker in native Kubernetes manifest files, as part of the Kubernetes kind “SpinnakerService” defined in its own Custom Resource Definition (CRD). With this approach, you can customize, save, deploy and generally manage Spinnaker configurations in a standard Kubernetes workflow for managing manifests. No need to learn a new CLI like Halyard, or worry about how to run that service.

The Spinnaker Operator has two flavors to choose from, depending on which Spinnaker you want to use: Open Source or Armory Spinnaker.

With the Spinnaker Operator, you can:

  • Use “kubectl” to install and configure a brand new Spinnaker (OSS or Armory Spinnaker).
  • Take over an existing Spinnaker installation deployed by Halyard and continue managing it with the operator going forward.
  • Use Kustomize or Helm Charts to manage different Spinnaker installations with slight variations.
  • Use Spinnaker profile files for providing service-specific configuration overrides (the equivalent of clouddriver-local.yml, gate-local.yml, etc.)
  • Use Spinnaker service settings files to tweak the way Deployment manifests for Spinnaker microservices are generated.
  • Use any raw files needed by configs in the SpinnakerService manifest (i.e. packer templates, support config files, etc.)
  • Safely store secret-free manifests under source control, since a SpinnakerService manifest can contain references to secrets stored in S3GCS or Vault (Vault is Armory Spinnaker only).

Additionally, Spinnaker Operator has some exclusive new features not available with other deployment methods like Halyard:

  • Spinnaker secrets can be read from Kubernetes secrets.
  • Spinnaker is automatically exposed with Kubernetes service load balancers (optional).
  • Experimental: Accounts can be provisioned and validated individually by using a different SpinnakerAccount manifest, so that adding new accounts involves creating a new manifest instead of having everything in a single manifest.

Let’s look at an example workflow.

Assuming you have stored SpinnakerService manifests under source control, you have a pipeline in Spinnaker to apply these manifests automatically on source control pushes (Spinnaker deploying Spinnaker) and you want to add a new Kubernetes account:

  1. Save the kubeconfig file of the new account in a Kubernetes secret, in the same namespace where Spinnaker is installed.
  2. Checkout Spinnaker config repository from source control.
  3. Add a new Kubernetes account to the SpinnakerService manifest file, referencing the kubeconfig in the secret:
apiVersion: spinnaker.armory.io/v1alpha2
kind: SpinnakerService
metadata:
name: spinnaker
spec:
spinnakerConfig:
config:
version: 2.17.1 # the version of Spinnaker to be deployed
persistentStorage:
persistentStoreType: s3
s3:
bucket: acme-spinnaker
rootFolder: front50
+ providers:
+ kubernetes:
+ enabled: true
+ accounts:
+ - name: kube-staging
+ requiredGroupMembership: []
+ providerVersion: V2
+ permissions: {}
+ dockerRegistries: []
+ configureImagePullSecrets: true
+ cacheThreads: 1
+ namespaces: []
+ omitNamespaces: []
+ kinds: []
+ omitKinds: []
+ customResources: []
+ cachingPolicies: []
+ oAuthScopes: []
+ onlySpinnakerManaged: false
+ kubeconfigFile: encryptedFile:k8s!n:spinnaker-secrets!k:kube-staging-kubeconfig # secret name: spinnaker-secrets, secret key: kube-staging-kubeconfig
+ primaryAccount: kube-staging
  1. Commit the changes and open a Pull Request for review.
  2. Pull Request approved and merged.
  3. Automatically a Spinnaker pipeline runs and applies the updated manifest.

We hope that the Spinnaker Operator will make installing, configuring and managing Spinnaker easier and more powerful. We’re enhancing Spinnaker iteratively, and welcome your feedback.

Get OSS Spinnaker Operator (documentation)

Get Armory Spinnaker Operator (documentation)

Interested in learning more about the Spinnaker Operator? Reach out to us here or on Spinnaker Slack – we’d love to chat!

Spinnaker: 1.18 Release Introduces Spinnaker Community Stats

By Blog, Project

Author: Spinnaker Steering Committee (Travis Tomsu, Software Engineer, Google)

The Spinnaker community has grown significantly after launching as an open source project in 2015. The project maintainers increasingly look for ways to help the community better understand how Spinnaker is used, and to help contributors prioritize future improvements.

Today, feature development is guided by industry experts, community discussions, Special Interest Groups (SIGs), and events like the recently held Spinnaker Summit. In August 2019, the community published an RFC, which proposed the tooling that will enable everyone to make data-driven decisions based on product usage across all platforms. We encourage Spinnaker users to continue providing feedback, and to review and comment on the RFC.

Following on from this RFC, the Spinnaker 1.18 release includes an initial implementation of statistics collection capabilities that are used to collect generic deployment and usage information from Spinnaker installations around the world. Before going into the details, here are some important facts to know:

  • No personally identifying information (PII) is collected or logged.
  • The implementation was reviewed and is approved by the Linux Foundation’s Telemetry Data Collection and Usage Policy.
  • All stats collection code is open source and can be found in the Spinnaker statsEcho, and Kork repos found on GitHub.
  • Users can disable statistics collection at any time through a single Halyard command.
  • Community members that want to work with the underlying dataset and/or dashboard reports can request and receive full access.

This feature exists in the Spinnaker 1.18 release,but is disabled by default while we finalize testing of the backend and fine-tune report dashboards. The feature will be enabled by default in the Spinnaker 1.19 release (scheduled for March 2020).

All data will be stored in a Google BigQuery database, and report dashboards will be publicly available from the Community Stats page. Community members can request access to the collection data.

Data collected as part of this effort allows the entire community to better monitor the growth of Spinnaker, understand how Spinnaker is used “in the wild”, and prioritize feature development across a large community of Spinnaker contributors. Thank you for supporting Spinnaker and for your help in continuing to make Spinnaker better!

From Armory – Kelsey Hightower on Spinnaker: Culture is what you DO

By Blog, Member

Originally posted on the Armory blog, by Rosalind Benoit

“Let Google’s CloudBuild handle building, testing, and pushing the artifact to your repository. #WithSpinnaker, you can go as fast as you want, whenever you’re ready.”

Calling all infrastructure nerds, SREs, platforms engineers, and the like: if you’ve never seen Kelsey Hightower speak in person, add it to your bucket list. Last week, he gave a talk at Portland’s first Spinnaker meetup, hosted at New Relic by the amazing PDX DevOps GroundUp. I cackled and cried at the world’s most poignant ‘Ops standup’ routine. Of course, he thrilled the Armory tribe with his praise of Spinnaker’s “decoupling of high level primitives,” and I can share some key benefits that Kelsey highlighted:

  • Even with many different build systems, you can consolidate deployments #withSpinnaker. Each can notify Spinnaker to pick up new artifacts as they are ready.
  • Spinnaker’s application-centric approach helps achieve continuous delivery buy-in. It gives application owners the control they crave, within automated guardrails that serialize your software delivery culture. 
  • Building manual judgements into heavy deployment automation is a “holy grail” for some. #WithSpinnaker, we can end the fallacy of “just check in code and everything goes to prod.” We can codify the steps in between as part of the pipeline. 
  • Spinnaker uses the perfect integration point. It removes the brittleness of scripting out the transition between a ‘ready-to-rock’ artifact and an application running in production. 

Kelsey’s words have profound impact. He did give some practical advice, like “Don’t run Spinnaker on the same cluster you’re deploying to,” and of course, keep separate build and deploy target environments. But the way Kelsey talked about culture struck a chord. We called the meetup, “Serializing culture into continuous delivery,” and in his story, Kelsey explained that culture is what you do: the actions you take as you work; your steps in approaching problems. 

Is Spinnaker The Hard Way coming?

Yes, please!

I’m reminded of working on a team struggling with an “agile transformation” through a series of long, circular discussions. I urged my team, “Scrum is just something that you do!” You go to standups, and do demos. You get better at pointing work over time. The ceremonies matter because you adapt by doing the work

Kelsey says his doing approach starts with raising his hand and saying, “I would like to own that particular problem,” and then figuring it out as he goes. Really owning a problem requires jumping in to achieve a deep understanding of it. It’s living it, and sharing with others who have lived it. We can BE our culture by learning processes hands-on, digging into the business reasons behind constraints, and using that knowledge to take ownership. Hiding behind culture talk doesn’t cut it, since you have to do it before you can change it. 

Tweets: Spinnaker is complex, but the return on investment is totally worth it

“The return on investment is totally worth it”

Another important way of doing: recognizing when you don’t know how to do it and need some help. Powerful open source projects like Kubernetes and Spinnaker can become incredibly complicated to implement in a way that faithfully serializes your culture. Responsible ownership means getting the help you need to execute.

I love how Kelsey juxtaposed the theatrics and hero mythology behind change management and outage “war rooms” with the stark truth of the business needs behind our vital services. As Kelsey shared his Ops origins story, I recalled my own – the rocket launch music that played in my head the first time I successfully restarted the java process for an LMS I held the pager for, contrasted with the sick feeling I got when reading the complaining tweets from university students who relied on the system and had their costly education disrupted by the outage. I knew the vast majority of our students worked full time and paid their own way, and that many had families to juggle as I do. This was the real story of our work. It drove home the importance of continuous improvement, and meant that our slow-moving software delivery culture frustrated the heck out of me. 

Kelsey's Deployment Guide Doc

Kelsey’s LOL simulation of the Word doc deployment guide at his first “real” job. Got a deployment horror story about a Word-copied command with an auto-replaced en-dash on a flag not triggered until after database modification scripts had already run? I do!

So what do you do if you’re Kelsey? You become an expert at serializing a company’s decisions around software delivery and telling them, as a quietly functioning story, with the best-in-class open source and Google tooling of the moment. He tells the story of his first automation journey: “So I started to serialize culture,” he says, when most of the IT department left him to fend for himself over the winter holidays. Without trying to refactor applications, he set to work codifying the software delivery practices he had come to understand through Ops. He automated processes, using tools his team felt comfortable with. 

He said, “We never walked around talking about all of our automation tools,” and that’s not a secrecy move, it’s his awareness of cognitive dissonance and cognitive overload. Because he had created a system based on application owners expectations, their comfort zone, he didn’t need to talk about it! It just worked (better and more efficiently over time, of course), and fulfilled the business case. Like Agile, this approach limits the scope of what one has to wrap their brain around to be excellent. Like Spinnaker, it empowers developers to focus on what they do best.

Instead of talking about the transformation you need, start by starting. Then change will begin.

Join Spinnaker Slack to learn more about Spinnaker and connect with folks who use and operate it. Read more about starting where you are, with what you have, or reach out to product@armory.io to set up a value stream mapping discovery day with experts from Armory and Continuity. 

Tweets: Spinnaker and Jenkins

Spinnaker and Jenkins can cooperate to deliver software if that’s what makes sense in your culture.

Tweet: I learned so much from Kelsey's talk on Spinnaker

Kelsey is a #legend for his techniques for getting people comfortable with new tools and automation!

From Spinnaker – April’s Spinnaker Gardening #CommunityHack is Going Virtual!

By Blog, Project
Spinnaker Gardening Days Community Hack

Originally posted on the Armory blog, by Rosalind Benoit

Guess what?! Our Hackathon is going fully online! “Spinnaker Gardening Days #CommunityHack” happens in one month, and we’re gearing up for an international open-source work-from-home extravaganza! Via Zoom, Slack, and Github, we’ll empower you to move the needle on continuous delivery projects. Teams will hack, newcomers will train, and champions will share Spinnaker secrets. Click here to register and get your free tickets for the hackathon, training track, lunchtime learnings, or all three.

 Join other Spinnaker users and companies to learn and let your skills shine at this collaborative event. We’ll address open-source feature requests, extend the ecosystem, and have lots of fun. Thanks to our generous sponsor Salesforce, all logged-in participants will score prizes, premium swag, and lunch on us! Hack through the workday, or check out our noontime lightning talks. Visit the Spinnaker Gardening repository for the schedule and details.

Salesforce logo

The Armory Tribe celebrates the support of Salesforce and, in particular, Edgar Magana, a Spinnaker champion and Cloud Operations Architect. We recently sat down to discuss the Ops SIG, modeling and standardizing Spinnaker, and his ideas for hackathon projects. Read the full article here.

A relative newcomer to the Spinnaker community, but a veteran in matters of cloud computing, networking, and OSS projects like OpenStack, Edgar recently founded the Operations SIG (Special Interest Group). Just as he recognized that “the community needed a place to discuss how to operate Spinnaker better,” he also urges us to jump-start the Spinnaker community. He’s recommended improvements to the contributor experience, and persuaded Salesforce to sponsor this first-ever Spinnaker hackathon.

Of course, we touched on his most pressing open-source Spinnaker initiatives in our chat. Next up? Gather a team! 

“We really want to come to the hackathon with goals, and to put extra motivation for folks to address them as a community,” Edgar explains their sponsorship.

From Salesforce and the Ops SIG perspective, Edgar has two features stories to focus on at the hackathon:

  • “Run any OSS source code scanning software against Spinnaker microservices, and you’ll find a number of vulnerabilities in the libraries that Spinnaker leverages. We’d like to minimize and solve those as much as possible.” 
    • I’m pumped about this one because a) in many instances, this is a low-barrier-to-entry task that newer contributors can make a huge dent in, and b) every ops freak knows that fixing OSS dependencies is probably the most important security measure we touch. 
  • “Cloud driver scalability is another key initiative in progress. The dynamic account system works, but performance can be improved drastically for those using a large system with 800-1000 Kubernetes accounts. There was a bugfix in 1.17, but it still takes lots of time for clouddriver to cache new accounts, and this means a long startup time.”
    • Edgar would like to see new accounts dynamically appended to the cache instead of triggering another cache of all accounts, and has been collaborating with Armory engineers on a solution. Another excellent project goal for Community Gardening!

Here on Armory’s Community team, we second Edgar’s suggestion to make Spinnaker more “beginner-friendly” and welcoming to new contributors. Our top goals for the first half of 2020 revolve around improving the contributor experience, from promoting issue triage in SIGs, to creating and organizing documentation around Spinnaker development environment, release cycle, and contribution guidelines so that newcomers know where to find answers and how to get started. Expect to see a contributor experience project from us at the hackathon!

In the meantime, the Plugin Framework for Spinnaker that Armory and Netflix are building is maturing fast. This work will make Spinnaker more welcoming to contributors in another way: it provides clear extension points in the codebase, along with an easy way to load extensions to a running Spinnaker instance. With the Spinnaker Gardening Days, we want encourage you to build extensions. Moreover, we know that many teams using Spinnaker in production have already built custom tooling around it; we’re encouraging those teams to leverage the plugin framework to quickly share their work with the OSS community (sounds like a stellar hackathon project!). We’re better together, and with a widely adopted project like Spinnaker, you can feel sure that paying it forward will reap big dividends for you and your organization. Check out the Plugin Creators Guide and Plugin Users Guide to learn more!

Calling Edgar and all other incredible Spinnaker developers: it’s time to add your fantastic Spinnaker Gardening ideas to the Project Ideas Wiki, create a slack channel for your project, and start prepping for the most exciting online event of 2020! Don’t forget to register here and reserve your ticket : )

spinnaker-hackathon gardening readme

Learn more in the spinnaker-hackathon/gardening README