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From Jenkins – Join us for online UI/UX hackfest on May 25-29!

By Blog, Staff

Originally published by Oleg Nenashev on the Jenkins blog.

On behalf of the Jenkins User ExperienceDocumentation and Advocacy and Outreach special interest groups, we are happy to announce the online UI/UX hackfest on May 25-29! Everyone is welcome to participate, regardless of their Jenkins development experience.

The goal is to get together and work on improving Jenkins user experience, including but not limited to user interface and user documentation. We also invite you to share experiences about Jenkins and to participate in UX testing. The event follows the Jenkins is the Way theme and the most active contributors will get special edition swag and prizes!

register button

Event plan

This hackfest is NOT a hackathon. We do not expect participants to dedicate all their time during the event timeframe, but hop-in/hop-out as their time allows. Everybody can spend as much time as they are willing to dedicate. Spending a few days or just a few hours is fine, any contributions matter regardless of their size. Jenkins development experience is not required, we have newcomer-friendly stories for those who want to start contributing to the project. We will also have a 24/7 jenkinsci/hackfest Gitter chat for Q&A and coordination between contributors.

There will be 3 main tracks:

  • User Interface – Improve look&feel and accessibility for Jenkins users, work on new read-only interface for instances managed with configuration as code, create and update Jenkins themes, and many other topics. This track is coordinated by the UX SIG.
  • User Documentation – Improve and create new user documentationtutorials and solution pages. Also, there is ongoing documentation migration from Wiki to jenkins.io and plugin repositories. This track is coordinated by the Documentation SIG.
  • Spread the word – Write user stories for Jenkins Is The Way site and the Jenkins blog, post about your Jenkins user experience and new features, record overview and HOWTO videos, etc. This track is coordinated by the Advocacy and Outreach SIG.

We are working on publishing project ideas and issues for the listed tracks. The current list can be found on the UI / UX hackfest event page, this list will be finalized by the beginning of the hackfest. You are welcome to propose your own projects within the User Experience theme.

During the event, we will organize online meetups and ad-hoc training sessions in different timezones. All these sessions will be recorded and shared on our YouTube channel. There are no mandatory sessions you must attend, you are welcome to join ones remotely or watch the recordings. After the event we will invite participants to demo their projects at online meetings or recorded sessions.

Registration

register button

P.S: Note that the registration form has a question top 3 things we could change in Jenkins to improve your user experience. We would appreciate your response there!

Contacts

Please use the following contacts to contact organizers:

Resources

Swag and Prizes

Thanks to our sponsors (CloudBees, Inc. and Continuous Delivery Foundation), we are happy to offer swag to active contributors!

  • 50 most-active contributors will get an exclusive “Jenkins Is The Way” T-shirt and stickers
  • Active contributors will get Jenkins stickers and socks
  • We are working on special prizes for top contributors, to be announced later
Jenkins Is The Way T-shirt
Jenkins Stickers

Acknowledgements

We thank all contributors who participate in this event as committers! We especially thank all reviewers, organizers and those who participated in the initial program reviews and provided invaluable feedback. In particular, we thank User ExperienceDocumentation and Advocacy and Outreach SIG members who heavily contributed to this event.

We also thank sponsors of the event who make the swag and prizes possible: CloudBees, Inc. and Continuous Delivery Foundation (CDF). In addition to swag, CloudBees donates working time for event hosts and reviewers. CDF also sponsors our online meetup platform which we will be using for the event.

9 CD Foundation Projects Are Participating in this Year’s Google Summer of Code

By Blog, Staff

The CD Foundation has joined the list of organizations participating in Google’s Summer of Code (GSoc) this year. GSoC is an annual program aimed at bringing more student developers into open source software development. The CD Foundation projects Spinnaker and Screwdriver joined long-time participant Jenkins in providing mentors for a number of projects for students interested in continuous delivery and software pipeline infrastructure.

In total, 7 Jenkins projects, 2 Spinnaker and 1 Screwdriver project were accepted in this summer’s program. Mentors from many different organizations around the world are pitching in, including CD Foundation ambassadors.

“The CD Foundation is dedicated to supporting open source continuous delivery projects worldwide. Part of that mission includes supporting and encouraging the next generation of talented developers worldwide, said Tara Hernandez, Senior Engineering Manager, Google Cloud Platform and CD Foundation Technical Oversight Committee member. “Thank you to the students and mentors who work tirelessly to create and innovate for the GSoC. We hope everyone has a fantastic time coding and learning this summer. Congratulations!”

The following is a list of the projects accepted and links to each project description and associated mentors.

Jenkin’s Projects 

Loghi Perinpanayagam – Jenkins Machine Learning Plugin for Data Science

This project provides a plugin for data scientists to integrate Machine Learning Workflow with Jenkins.

Kezhi Xiong – GitHub Checks API for Jenkins Plugins

The GitHub Checks API allows developers to report the CI integrations’ detail information rather than binary pass/fail build status on GitHub pages.

stellargo – External Fingerprint Storage for Jenkins

File fingerprinting is a way to track which version of a file is being used by a job/build, making dependency tracking easy.

Rishabh Budhouliya – Git Plugin Performance Improvement

The principles of micro-benchmarking were used to create and execute a test suite which involves comparison of GitClient APIs implemented by CliGitAPIImpl and JGitAPIImpl using “average execution time per operation” as a performance metric.

Buddhika Chathuranga – Jenkins Windows Services: YAML Configuration Support

Enhance Jenkins master and agent service management on Windows by offering new configuration file formats and improving settings validation.

Zixuan Liu – Jenkins X: Consolidate the use of Apps / Addons

The main aim of the project is to consolidate Apps and Addons inside Jenkins X to avoid confusion.

Sladyn Nunes Custom Jenkins Distribution Build Service

The main idea behind the project is to build a customizable Jenkins distribution service that could be used to build tailor-made Jenkins distributions.

Spinnaker Projects

Victor Odusanya – Drone CI type for Spinnaker pipeline stage

Add Drone build type as a Spinnaker pipeline stage type.

Moki Daniel – “Continuous Delivery, Continuous Deployments with Spinnaker” 

This project idea will aim at ensuring continuous delivery and continuous deployments, bringing up automated releases, undertaking deployments across multiple cloud providers, and mastering the best built-in deployments practices from Spinnaker.

Screwdriver Project

Supratik Das – Improve SCM Integration

The two key areas where Screwdriver will be improved are introduction of deployment keys for seamless handling of private repositories and triggering of builds from external SCM repositories.

Thank you to all participants! We look forward to getting updates and information on progress over the summer. For more details, please continue to visit the CD Foundation blog.

Introducing our Newest CDF Ambassador – Zhao Xiaojie (Rick)

By Blog, Staff
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My name is Zhao Xiaojie (Rick). I’m a software engineer at Alauda, which is responsible for developing a CI/CD platform. I’m the leader of the Chinese Localization SIG and a press contact for Jenkins in China, too, where a large developer community exists invisible from the west! 

I am passionate about promoting the Jenkins community and have done so in several ways, such as running Jenkins official social media channels, encouraging people to contribute tech articles, giving speeches about Jenkins at related conferences, and maintaining the Chinese Jenkins website. 

I am also the author of several open source projects such as the Simplified Chinese Plugin, Jenkins CLI. And I have participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) twice as a mentor.

I’m a very active author and contributor in open source. I believe that CI/CD can speed business value shipping for all teams. Advocating CI/CD open source projects is an excellent way to help other teams and individuals adopt DevOps best practices. I enjoy giving public speeches or organizing meetups related to CI/CD. In my opinion, working with the CDF offers me a lot of opportunities to spread information about open source projects. The CDF ambassador program can help us to gather much more CI/CD fans.

You can find me on GitHub.

From Armory – The World of Jenkins: Better #withSpinnaker

By Blog, Member
Jenkins and Spinnaker, Better Together

Originally posted on the Armory blog by Rosalind Benoit

Folks in the DevOps community often ask me, “I’m already using Jenkins, so why should I use Spinnaker?” We’re hosting a virtual talk to address the question! Register here to join us 3/26 and learn how Jenkins and Spinnaker cooperate for safe, scalable, maintainable software delivery.

A delivery engineer I spoke with last week said it best:

“I came from a world of using Jenkins to deploy. It’s great but, you’re just modifying Jenkins jobs. It can do a lot, but it’s like that line in Jurassic Park – ‘Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.’”

Many of us came from that world: we built delivery automation with scripts and tools like Jenkins, CircleCI, Bamboo, and TeamCity. We found configuration management, and used Puppet or Ansible to provision infrastructure in our pipelines as code. We became addicted to D.R.Y. (don’t repeat yourself), and there is no looking back.

Jenkins provides approachable automation of continuous integration steps. Spinnaker works with Jenkins to pick up and deliver build artifacts, and to delegate pipeline stages. As a true continuous delivery platform, Spinnaker codifies your unique software delivery culture and processes to your comfort level. It also adds production-ready value to your pipelines:

  • Turnkey automation of advanced delivery strategies such as canary deployments
  • One-click rollbacks
  • Single pane of glass to view deployments, applications, server groups, clusters, load balancers, security groups, and firewalls
  • Centralized API to automate and integrate across your toolchain

Jenkins taught us many lessons. It popularized the use of imperative pipelines to execute ordered steps in a SDLC. It taught us that centralizing delivery workflows into one platform makes strategic sense in scaling operations. At the same time, especially when used for deployments, it suffers from instability and maintenance overhead brought by unchecked plugin sprawl. It struggles to offer a scalable model for managing multiple jobs and distributed apps. But the way it consolidated SDLC tasks within a full-featured GUI empowered developer teams to start doing delivery.

In the new world of fast innovation through immutable infrastructure, Spinnaker has adapted that visibility to the realms of cloud and cloud native. It provides a centralized vantage point on all of your ephemerally-packaged applications, in their many variations.  Within your pipelines, its guardrails identify invalid or non-compliant infrastructure before deployment even happens. Spinnaker’s smart delivery workflows insulate customers and end-users from impact to their software experience.

This sense of safety is Jenkins’ missing ingredient. Jenkins introduced a world where developers could independently chain together a path to production. It enabled us to improve our efficiency and code quality through testing and build automation, with self-service. This giant technological shift sparked a move away from waterfall development and ITIL-style delivery.

But, culture cannot change overnight. Developers who exercised this newfound power struck terror in the hearts of those accountable for availability and software-driven business goals. Culture lagged behind tooling, sparking fear and risk aversion. That fear still permeates many organizations, allowing baggage-free startups and the most nimble companies to digitally disrupt the status quo. These innovators prove that delivering highly valued interactions through software means increased profit and influence. Enter Armory Spinnaker.


Watch Armory CTO Isaac Mosquera’s Supercharge Your Deployments With Spinnaker and Jenkins presentation at CD Summit, or check out the longer version with Q&A at DeliveryConf.

Stop spending time and talent knitting your toolchain together with pipeline steps that rely on brittle, expensive-to-maintain scripts and repetitive GUI fiddles! Attend “I have Jenkins; why do I need Spinnaker?” to learn more about how Spinnaker can free your developers and evolve your continuous delivery game.

From Jenkins – Google Summer of Code 2019 Report

By Blog, Project

Originally posted on the Jenkins blog by Martin d’AnjouJeff PearceOleg NenashevMarky Jackson

Google Summer of Code is much more than a summer internship program, it is a year-round effort for the organization and some community members. Now, after the DevOps World | Jenkins World conference in Lisbon and final retrospective meetings, we can say that GSoC 2019 is officially over. We would like to start by thanking all participants: students, mentors, subject matter experts and all other contributors who proposed project ideas, participated in student selection, in community bonding and in further discussions and reviews. Google Summer of Code is a major effort which would not be possible without the active participation of the Jenkins community.

In this blogpost we would like to share the results and our experience from the previous year.

Results

Five GSoC projects were successfully completed this year: Role Strategy Plugin Performance ImprovementsPlugins Installation Manager CLI Tool/LibraryWorking Hours Plugin – UI ImprovementsRemoting over Apache Kafka with Kubernetes featuresMulti-branch Pipeline support for Gitlab SCM. We will talk about the projects a little later in the document.

Highlights

Project details

We held the final presentations as Jenkins Online Meetups in late August and Google published the results on Sept 3rd. The final presentations can be found here: Part 1Part 2Part 3. We also presented the 2019 Jenkins GSoC report at the DevOps World | Jenkins World San Francisco and at the DevOps World | Jenkins World 2019 Lisbon conferences.

In the following sections, we present a brief summary of each project, links to the coding phase 3 presentations, and to the final products.

Role Strategy Plugin Performance Improvements

Role Strategy Plugin is one of the most widely used authorization plugins for Jenkins, but it has never been famous for performance due to architecture issues and regular expression checks for project roles. Abhyudaya Sharma was working on this project together with hist mentors: Oleg NenashevRunze Xia and Supun Wanniarachchi. He started the project from creating a new Micro-benchmarking Framework for Jenkins Plugins based on JMH, created benchmarks and achieved a 3501% improvement on some real-world scenarios. Then he went further and created a new Folder-based Authorization Strategy Plugin which offers even better performance for Jenkins instances where permissions are scoped to folders. During his project Abhyudaya also fixed the Jenkins Configuration-as-Code support in Role Strategy and contributed several improvements and fixes to the JCasC Plugin itself.

Role strategy performance improvements

Plugins Installation Manager CLI Tool/Library

Natasha Stopa was working on a new CLI tool for plugin management, which should unify features available in other tools like install-plugins.sh in Docker images. It also introduced many new features like YAML configuration format support, listing of available updates and security fixes. The newly created tool should eventually replace the previous ones. Natasha’s mentors: Kristin WhetstoneJon Brohauge and Arnab Banerjee. Also, many contributors from Platform SIG and JCasC plugin team joined the project as a key stakeholders and subject-matter experts.

Plugin Manager Tool YAML file

Working Hours Plugin – UI Improvements

Jenkins UI and frontend framework are a common topic in the Jenkins project, especially in recent months after the new UX SIG was established. Jack Shen was working on exploring new ways to build Jenkins Web UI together with his mentor Jeff Pearce. Jack updated the Working Hours Plugin to use UI controls provided by standard React libraries. Then he documented his experienced and created template for plugins with React-based UI.

Web UI controls in React

Remoting over Apache Kafka with Kubernetes features

Long Le Vu Nguyen was working on extended Kubernetes support in the Remoting over Apache Kafka Plugin. His mentors were Andrey Falco and Pham vu Tuan who was our GSoC 2018 student and the plugin creator. During this project Long has added a new agent launcher which provisions Jenkins agents in Kubernetes and connects them to the master. He also created a Cloud API implementation for it and a new Helm chart which can provision Jenkins as entire system in Kubernetes, with Apache Kafka enabled by default. All these features were released in Remoting over Apache Kafka Plugin 2.0.

Jenkins in Kubernetes with Apache Kafka

Multi-branch Pipeline support for Gitlab SCM

Parichay Barpanda was working on the new GitLab Branch Source Plugin with Multi-branch Pipeline Jobs and Folder Organisation support. His mentors were Marky Jackson-TauliaJustin HarringaZhao Xiaojie and Joseph Petersen. The plugin scans the projects, importing the pipeline jobs it identifies based on the criteria provided. After a project is imported, Jenkins immediately runs the jobs based on the Jenkinsfile pipeline script and notifies the status to GitLab Pipeline Status. This plugin also provides GitLab server configuration which can be configured in Configure System or via Jenkins Configuration as Code (JCasC). read more about this project in the GitLab Branch Source 1.0 announcement.

Gitlab Multi-branch Pipeline support

Projects which were not completed

Not all projects have been completed this year. We were also working on Artifact Promotion plugin for Jenkins Pipeline and on Cloud Features for External Workspace Manager Plugin, but unfortunately both projects were stopped after coding phase 1. Anyway, we got a lot of experience and takeaways in these areas (see linked Jira tickets!. We hope that these stories will be implemented by Jenkins contributors at some point. Google Summer of Code 2020 maybe?

Running the GSoC program at our organization level

Here are some of the things our organization did before and during GSoC behind the scenes. To prepare for the influx of students, we updated all our GSoC pages and wrote down all the knowledge we accumulated over the years of running the program. We started preparing in October 2018, long before the official start of the program. The main objective was to address the feedback we got during GSoC 2018 retrospectives.

Project ideas. We started gathering project ideas in the last months of 2018. We prepared a list of project ideas in a Google doc, and we tracked ownership of each project in a table of that document. Each project idea was further elaborated in its own Google doc. We find that when projects get complicated during the definition phase, perhaps they are really too complicated and should not be done.

Since we wanted all the project ideas to be documented the same way, we created a template to guide the contributors. Most of the project idea documents were written by org admins or mentors, but occasionally a student proposed a genuine idea. We also captured contact information in that document such as GitHub and Gitter handles, and a preliminary list of potential mentors for the project. We embedded all the project documents on our website.

Mentor and student guidelines. We updated the mentor information page with details on what we expect mentors to do during the program, including the number of hours that are expected from mentors, and we even have a section on preventing conflict of interest. When we recruit mentors, we point them to the mentor information page.

We also updated the student information page. We find this is a huge time saver as every student contacting us has the same questions about joining and participating in the program. Instead of re-explaining the program each time, we send them a link to those pages.

Application phase. Students started to reach out very early on as well, many weeks before GSoC officially started. This was very motivating. Some students even started to work on project ideas before the official start of the program.

Project selection. This year the org admin team had some very difficult decisions to make. With lots of students, lots of projects and lots of mentors, we had to request the right number of slots and try to match the projects with the most chances of success. We were trying to form mentor teams at the same time as we were requesting the number of slots, and it was hard to get responses from all mentors in time for the deadline. Finally we requested fewer slots than we could have filled. When we request slots, we submit two numbers: a minimum and a maximum. The GSoC guide states that:

  • The minimum is based on the projects that are so amazing they really want to see these projects occur over the summer,
  • and the maximum number should be the number of solid and amazing projects they wish to mentor over the summer.

We were awarded minimum. So we had to make very hard decisions: we had to decide between “amazing” and “solid” proposals. For some proposals, the very outstanding ones, it’s easy. But for the others, it’s hard. We know we cannot make the perfect decision, and by experience, we know that some students or some mentors will not be able to complete the program due to uncontrollable life events, even for the outstanding proposals. So we have to make the best decision knowing that some of our choices won’t complete the program.

Community Bonding. We have found that the community bonding phase was crucial to the success of each project. Usually projects that don’t do well during community bonding have difficulties later on. In order to get students involved in the community better, almost all projects were handled under the umbrella of Special Interest Groups so that there were more stakeholders and communications.

Communications. Every year we have students who contact mentors via personal messages. Students, if you are reading this, please do NOT send us personal messages about the projects, you will not receive any preferential treatment. Obviously, in open source we want all discussions to be public, so students have to be reminded of that regularly. In 2019 we are using Gitter chat for most communications, but from an admin point of view this is more fragmented than mailing lists. It is also harder to search. Chat rooms are very convenient because they are focused, but from an admin point of view, the lack of threads in Gitter makes it hard to get an overview. Gitter threads were added recently (Nov 2019) but do not yet work well on Android and iOS. We adopted Zoom Meetings towards the end of the program and we are finding it easier to work with than Google Hangouts.

Status tracking. Another thing that was hard was to get an overview of how all the projects were doing once they were running. We made extensive use of Google sheets to track lists of projects and participants during the program to rank projects and to track statuses of project phases (community bonding, coding, etc.). It is a challenge to keep these sheets up to date, as each project involves several people and several links. We have found it time consuming and a bit hard to keep these sheets up to date, accurate and complete, especially up until the start of the coding phase.

Perhaps some kind of objective tracking tool would help. We used Jenkins Jira for tracking projects, with each phase representing a separate sprint. It helped a lot for successful projects. In our organization, we try to get everyone to beat the deadlines by a couple of days, because we know that there might be events such as power outages, bad weather (happens even in Seattle!), or other uncontrolled interruptions, that might interfere with submitting project data. We also know that when deadlines coincide with weekends, there is a risk that people may forget.

Retrospective. At the end of our project, we also held a retrospective and captured some ideas for the future. You can find the notes here. We already addressed the most important comments in our documentation and project ideas for the next year.

Recognition

Last year, we wanted to thank everyone who participated in the program by sending swag. This year, we collected all the mailing addresses we could and sent to everyone we could the 15-year Jenkins special edition T-shirt, and some stickers. This was a great feel good moment. I want to personally thank Alyssa Tong her help on setting aside the t-shirt and stickers.

swag before shipping

Mentor summit

Each year Google invites two or more mentors from each organization to the Google Summer of Code Mentor Summit. At this event, hundreds of open-source project maintainers and mentors meet together and have unconference sessions targeting GSoC, community management and various tools. This year the summit was held in Munich, and we sent Marky Jackson and Oleg Nenashev as representatives there.

Apart from discussing projects and sharing chocolate, we also presented Jenkins there, conducted a lightning talk and hosted the unconference session about automation bots for GitHub. We did not make a team photo there, so try to find Oleg and Marky on this photo:

GSoC2019 Mentor summit

GSoC Team at DevOps World | Jenkins World

We traditionally use GSoC organization payments and travel grants to sponsor student trips to major Jenkins-related events. This year four students traveled to the DevOps World | Jenkins World conferences in San-Francisco and Lisbon. Students presented their projects at the community booth and at the contributor summits, and their presentations got a lot of traction in the community!

Thanks a lot to Google and CloudBees who made these trips possible. You can find a travel report from Natasha Stopa here, more travel reports are coming soon.

gsoc2019 team jw us
gsoc2019 team jw lisbon

Conclusion

This year, five projects were successfully completed. We find this to be normal and in line with what we hear from other participating organizations.

Taking the time early to update our GSoC pages saved us a lot of time later because we did not have to repeat all the information every time someone contacted us. We find that keeping track of all the mentors, the students, the projects, and the meta information is a necessary but time consuming task. We wish we had a tool to help us do that. Coordinating meetings and reminding participants of what needs to be accomplished for deadlines is part of the cheerleading aspect of GSoC, we need to keep doing this.

Lastly, I want to thank again all participants, we could not do this without you. Each year we are impressed by the students who do great work and bring great contributions to the Jenkins community.

GSoC 2020?

Yes, there will be Google Summer of Code 2020! We plan to participate, and we are looking for project ideas, mentors and students. Jenkins GSoC pages have been already updated towards the next year, and we invite everybody interested to join us next year!

From Jenkins – GitHub App authentication support released

By Blog, Project

Originally posted on the Jenkins blog by Tim Jacomb

I’m excited to announce support for authenticating as a GitHub app in Jenkins. This has been a long awaited feature by many users.

It has been released in GitHub Branch Source 2.7.0-beta1 which is available in the Jenkins experimental update center.

Authenticating as a GitHub app brings many benefits:

  • Larger rate limits – The rate limit for a GitHub app scales with your organization size, whereas a user based token has a limit of 5000 regardless of how many repositories you have.
  • User-independent authentication – Each GitHub app has its own user-independent authentication. No more need for ‘bot’ users or figuring out who should be the owner of 2FA or OAuth tokens.
  • Improved security and tighter permissions – GitHub Apps offer much finer-grained permissions compared to a service user and its personal access tokens. This lets the Jenkins GitHub app require a much smaller set of privileges to run properly.
  • Access to GitHub Checks API – GitHub Apps can access the the GitHub Checks API to create check runs and check suites from Jenkins jobs and provide detailed feedback on commits as well as code annotation

Getting started

Install the GitHub Branch Source plugin, make sure the version is at least 2.7.0-beta1. Installation guidelines for beta releases are available here

Configuring the GitHub Organization Folder

Follow the GitHub App Authentication setup guide. These instructions are also linked from the plugin’s README on GitHub.

Once you’ve finished setting it up, Jenkins will validate your credential and you should see your new rate limit. Here’s an example on a large org:

GitHub app rate limit

How do I get an API token in my pipeline?

In addition to usage of GitHub App authentication for Multi-Branch Pipeline, you can also use app authentication directly in your Pipelines. You can access the Bearer token for the GitHub API by just loading a ‘Username/Password’ credential as usual, the plugin will handle authenticating with GitHub in the background.

This could be used to call additional GitHub API endpoints from your pipeline, possibly the deployments api or you may wish to implement your own checks api integration until Jenkins supports this out of the box.

Note: the API token you get will only be valid for one hour, don’t get it at the start of the pipeline and assume it will be valid all the way through

Example: Let’s submit a check run to Jenkins from our Pipeline:

pipeline {
  agent any

  stages{
    stage('Check run') {
      steps {
        withCredentials([usernamePassword(credentialsId: 'githubapp-jenkins',
                                          usernameVariable: 'GITHUB_APP',
                                          passwordVariable: 'GITHUB_JWT_TOKEN')]) {
            sh '''
            curl -H "Content-Type: application/json" \
                 -H "Accept: application/vnd.github.antiope-preview+json" \
                 -H "authorization: Bearer ${GITHUB_JWT_TOKEN}" \
                 -d '{ "name": "check_run", \
                       "head_sha": "'${GIT_COMMIT}'", \
                       "status": "in_progress", \
                       "external_id": "42", \
                       "started_at": "2020-03-05T11:14:52Z", \
                       "output": { "title": "Check run from Jenkins!", \
                                   "summary": "This is a check run which has been generated from Jenkins as GitHub App", \
                                   "text": "...and that is awesome"}}' https://api.github.com/repos/<org>/<repo>/check-runs
            '''
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

What’s next

GitHub Apps authentication in Jenkins is a huge improvement. Many teams have already started using it and have helped improve it by giving pre-release feedback. There are more improvements on the way.

There’s a proposed Google Summer of Code project: GitHub Checks API for Jenkins Plugins. It will look at integrating with the Checks API, with a focus on reporting issues found using the warnings-ng plugin directly onto the GitHub pull requests, along with test results summary on GitHub. Hopefully it will make the Pipeline example below much simpler for Jenkins users 🙂 If you want to get involved with this, join the GSoC Gitter channel and ask how you can help.

From Jenkins – Validating JCasC configuration files using Visual Studio Code

By Blog, Project

Originally posted on the Jenkins Blog by Sladyn Nunes

Configuration-as-code plugin

Problem Statement: Convert the existing schema validation workflow from the current scripting language in the Jenkins Configuration as Code Plugin to a Java based rewrite thereby enhancing its readablity and testability supported by a testing framework for the same. Enhance developer experience by developing a VSCode Plugin to facilitate autocompletion and validation which would help the developer write correct yaml files before application to a Jenkins Instance.

The Configuration as Code plugin has been designed as an opinionated way to configure Jenkins based on human-readable declarative configuration files. Writing such a file should be feasible without being a Jenkins expert, just translating into code a configuration process one is used to executing in the web UI. The plugin uses a schema to verify the files being applied to the Jenkins instance.

With the new JSON Schema being enabled developers can now test their yaml file against it. The schema checks the descriptors i.e. configuration that can be applied to a plugin or Jenkins core, the correct type is used and help text is provided in some cases. VSCode allows us to test out the schema right out of the box with some modifications. This project was built as part of the Community Bridge initiative which is a platform created by the Linux Foundation to empower developers — and the individuals and companies who support them — to advance sustainability, security, and diversity in open source technology. You can take a look at the Jenkins Community Bridge Project Page

Steps to Enable the Schema Validation

a) The first step includes installing the JCasC Plugin for Visual Studio Code and opening up the extension via the extension list. Shortcut for opening the extension list in VSCode editor using Ctrl + Shift + X.

b) In order to enable validation we need to include it in the workspace settings. Navigate to File and then Preference and then Settings. Inside settings search for json and inside settings.json include the following configuration.

{
"yaml.schemas": {
        "schema.json": "y[a]?ml"
    }
}

You can specify a glob pattern as the value for schema.json which is the file name for the schema. This would apply the schema to all yaml files. eg: .[y[a]?ml]

c) The following tasks can be done using VSCode:

a) Auto completion (Ctrl + Space):
  Auto completes on all commands.
b) Document Outlining (Ctrl + Shift + O):
Provides the document outlining of all completed nodes in the file.

d) Create a new file under the work directory called jenkins.yml. For example consider the following contents for the file:

jenkins:
  systemMessage: “Hello World”
  numExecutors: 2
  1. The above yaml file is valid according to the schema and vscode should provide you with validation and autocompletion for the same.

Screenshots

vscode
userDocs1
userDocs2

We are holding an online meetup on the 26th February regarding this plugin and how you could use it to validate your YAML configuration files. For any suggestions or dicussions regarding the schema feel free to join our gitter channel. Issues can be created on Github.

From Jenkins – WebSocket

By Blog, Project

Originally posted on the Jenkins blog by Jesse Glick

I am happy to report that JEP-222 has landed in Jenkins weeklies, starting in 2.217. This improvement brings experimental WebSocket support to Jenkins, available when connecting inbound agents or when running the CLI. The WebSocket protocol allows bidirectional, streaming communication over an HTTP(S) port.

While many users of Jenkins could benefit, implementing this system was particularly important for CloudBees because of how CloudBees Core on modern cloud platforms (i.e., running on Kubernetes) configures networking. When an administrator wishes to connect an inbound (formerly known as “JNLP”) external agent to a Jenkins master, such as a Windows virtual machine running outside the cluster and using the agent service wrapper, until now the only option was to use a special TCP port. This port needed to be opened to external traffic using low-level network configuration. For example, users of the nginx ingress controller would need to proxy a separate external port for each Jenkins service in the cluster. The instructions to do this are complex and hard to troubleshoot.

Using WebSocket, inbound agents can now be connected much more simply when a reverse proxy is present: if the HTTP(S) port is already serving traffic, most proxies will allow WebSocket connections with no additional configuration. The WebSocket mode can be enabled in agent configuration, and support for pod-based agents in the Kubernetes plugin is coming soon. You will need an agent version 4.0 or later, which is bundled with Jenkins in the usual way (Docker images with this version are coming soon).

Another part of Jenkins that was troublesome for reverse proxy users was the CLI. Besides the SSH protocol on port 22, which again was a hassle to open from the outside, the CLI already had the ability to use HTTP(S) transport. Unfortunately the trick used to implement that confused some proxies and was not very portable. Jenkins 2.217 offers a new -webSocket CLI mode which should avoid these issues; again you will need to download a new version of jenkins-cli.jar to use this mode.

The WebSocket code has been tested against a sample of Kubernetes implementations (including OpenShift), but it is likely that some bugs and limitations remain, and scalability of agents under heavy build loads has not yet been tested. Treat this feature as beta quality for now and let us know how it works!

From Jenkins – Atlassian’s new Bitbucket Server integration for Jenkins

By Blog, Project

Originally posted on the Jenkins blog by Daniel Kjellin

We know that for many of our customers Jenkins is incredibly important and its integration with Bitbucket Server is a key part of their development workflow. Unfortunately, we also know that integrating Bitbucket Server with Jenkins wasn’t always easy – it may have required multiple plugins and considerable time. That’s why earlier this year we set out to change this. We began building our own integration, and we’re proud to announce that v1.0 is out.

The new Bitbucket Server integration for Jenkins plugin, which is built and supported by Atlassian, is the easiest way to link Jenkins with Bitbucket Server. It streamlines the entire set-up process, from creating a webhook to trigger builds in Jenkins, to posting build statuses back to Bitbucket Server. It also supports smart mirroring and lets Jenkins clone from mirrors to free up valuable resources on your primary server.

Our plugin is available to install through Jenkins now. Watch this video to find out how, or read the BitBucket Server solution page to learn more about it.

Once you’ve tried it out we’d love to hear any feedback you have. To share it with us, visit https://issues.jenkins-ci.org and create an issue using the component atlassian-bitbucket-server-integration-plugin.

Introducing our newest CDF Ambassador – Marky Jackson

By Blog, Staff

Hello friends! I am Marky Jackson and I am so thrilled to be one of the newest CDF ambassadors.

I have been involved in open source for many years but my start in the world was rather rocky. I had a difficult childhood. I was shuffled from one boys’ home to another and had little control over my life. But I was tough and smart, and I emancipated at an early age, which allowed me to start living the way I wanted while I was still in my teens.

I studied computer science at UCLA and MIT and then spent 14 months as an intern at Jasmine Multimedia Publishing before joining companies such as Yahoo, AT&T, HP, Symantec and more.

I am extremely excited to be a part of this program because I get to make people smile by mentoring and being positive. I love public speaking, doing a meetup in person or virtual and helping people online. I get joy when a person gets involved in the open-source community.

The open source community is all about inclusion. We welcome people to contribute, and we try to express our gratitude for their hard work. The sense of unity and belonging is second to none with developers, coders, and engineers from around the world collaborating to advance our industry.

It takes a lot of time and effort to keep the open-source community going. Most of us are working after-hours to get things done, and we need help—lots of help. People think that you have to be an expert coder to join us, but that’s not true. There are plenty of ways to take part in. You can contribute error reports, write technical documentation, or even sponsor an application. There are plenty of ways to offer support. Just ask what you can do.

I look forward to meeting everyone and collaborating! You can find me at
@markyjackson5 on Twitter.